Coming soon: an open letter

By Joern Fischer

Thanks to those of you who responded to my recent post on “saving the world in two steps“. The idea was that perhaps some initiative is needed to let our leaders (at all levels) know that most scholars agree that something somewhat fundamental needs to change in how we go about our lives. What is that something? Hard to know. But unless we ask that question at least, it is very unlikely that incrementalism alone will lead to the right kind of change (from a sustainability perspective).

Having received largely positive, and exclusively constructive, feedback on a draft letter, this initiative is now going ahead. In a few days you will see a blog entry here pointing you to an online “open letter”. I would like you to keep an eye open for this, and help distribute it as widely as possible. If you agree with my logic in the above blog entry, please do sign the letter, and spread it via facebook, twitter, and send it to your colleagues and friends. The letter will be open for signatures from all scholars from PhD students onwards; and will be directed at societal leaders at all levels.

In short: please keep an eye open for this upcoming letter, which I will highlight on this blog when it goes live (probably this week!). And then, please help to spread it. Who knows what it will do? — I don’t know. But I do know what will happen if we simply do nothing. Nothing.

Stay tuned!

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One thought on “Coming soon: an open letter

  1. Hi Joern – thank you for posting the open letter, which is very thought provoking. I applaud and support your project. I wanted to mention a relevant paper that I published with some colleagues a couple of years ago on values in conservation, and this seemed a better place to comment than amongst all the signatures on the other blog. One of our main conclusions was that it is important that people think about their values and be honest with others about them. Your project would clearly encourage this process, but I suppose it is inevitable that many people will have many different values that would be difficult to mould into a new set of institutions. Still, I’m sure the process would get us thinking about alternatives to the values that underpin the perpetual growth paradigm that serves us all so badly! http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01592.x/abstract

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